Aeronautical Engineering

222 viewsMiscellaneous
0 Comments

I would like to do aeronautical engineering at my bachelors. But when I look at the colleges there are only a few colleges for bachelors in aeronautical engineering. So what do the people do? Bachelors in mechanical and masters in aeronautical. Or what ? I would need to know this because I would gonna need to filter colleges for me.

I would be happy if this message is forwarded to Chandan Mishra bro too.

Cheers

Suman

0

I might be answering this question late, but I hope it will be helpful to others. Like Chandan bro said, Mechanical, Aeronautical, Automotive, and Aerospace engineering all have a Mechanical Engineering root. Usually it is in the final year that you decide what you are interested in. For instance I am doing Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. During high school, I was aiming to major in Aeronautical Engineering.. make planes and stuffs. But now a Junior year student, I am working in bio robotics lab. Things change so does your interest. But if you are really into aeronautical, but confused, I suggest that you go for Mechanical Engineering. As a Mechanical Engineering graduate you should have no problem joining a graduate school and focus your studies in aerospace, aeronautical, or robotics.

0
Anonymous 0 Comments

I understand your concern. However, I wouldn’t personally hold myself from doing a mechanical/aerospace degree from a liberal arts. In fact take that in a positive way, in that getting an engineering degree from a liberal arts college will give you a diverse education (as you say you will have knowledge of economics and music) whereas a engineering focused school might give you a more rigorous engineering education but not as diverse. But when you go to graduate school, you will focus much more on engineering anyways but then you can’t learn things you would in a liberal arts college. I hope you understand what I am getting at. With the way the job markets are evolving, I think it would be wise to have a broader education. You never know when the skills come in handy.

 

Chandan

This answer is verified. Answer written by Chandan Mishra. 

0

Also, it is highly recommended to keep your major as general as possible, and specialize during your 3rd and 4th years of bachelors, or wait for your masters. As an example, aeronautical engineering industry requires specific knowledge, and people tend to focus on one aspect of aeronautics, which is typically done in Master’s degree. The reason for not that many universities offering the major is the fact that there is not much demand for the program, and mechanical engineer can very well do the job, with a few months of training.

0
Anonymous 0 Comments

And how is the choice of liberal arts college? What would you say if I think liberal arts in mechanical/aerospace engineering may not be rigor as in normal engineering because you would be not focusing from the beginning of your bachelors on your course of study (you would have eyes on music, economics….). What does this mean.

0

Hello Suman,

Thanks for reaching out.My first advice, before anything would be don’t filter out your college options now. What really matters for now, and I sure others would back me up on this, is getting a good scholarship and being at a decent college. You might be fully sure about being an aeronautical engineer but hold on to that. As long you are passionate about it, you will definitely be one. And you are quite right, most bachelor’s degree in aerospace shares a lot of similarities with mechanical engineering. It is only in the final year that things get more aero focused for aerospace engineering.So my advice would be don’t limit your choice to colleges that have a specifc aerospace degree. Getting a bachelors degree in mechanical and masters in aerospace would be a great and broad option as well. Hope it helps. Good luck.

This answer is verified. Answer Written by Chandan Mishra.